Category: digital art academy

Watercolors on the Computer

Asian Inks

Asian Inks

Asian Inks-a

Asian Inks-a

This is two versions of the same painting. I am taking a Japanese Inks class at the Digital Art Academy.  It is an on-line school that teaches art using Painter by Corel. We are studying sumi-e painting.

The idea behind Asian art is that less is more.  The negative is as important as the positive.  Just like the yin/yang symbol.

At the same time, over at Skip Allen Paints , Skip has put up some demos of new watercolor brushes for Painter and videos explaining the brushes.  Skip is also doing sumi-e painting with his new brushes. Please check them out.  They are gorgeous.

Taking what I learned at DAA and from Skip, I did this painting with Skip’s new Wet Water watercolors.

Then, I added a texture on a layer under the painting.  On a layer on top, I added black and used composite method on the layer and turned the piece to gray-scale.

I am struggling with the concept of leaving white in the painting and letting that act as part of the piece.  Asian art is also about letting just a few strokes tell the story.  That is something I am working on in my abstract paintings and the reason I took this course. I think I am not alone in finding it difficult to do less in my art.  I always want to add a bit here, a bit there.  The next thing I know, it’s overworked. I couldn’t make up my mind which one I liked best, so I posted both.

This is Blog 100

Japanese Inks

Japanese Inks

I’m so excited.  This is my 100th blog.  I never realized what I was getting into when I started blogging.

I thought I would be the lone blogger picking up a follower here or there.  Then, I found Word Press.  Word Press makes the blogging experience very special.

First, they make it relatively easy to set up your blog with a theme of your choice.  Second, whenever I’ve been stuck, people have been there to help me.

The community of Word Press bloggers blows me away.  Word Press works at bringing us together to share our love of blogging.  I feel like I belong to a special community that is incredibly supportive.

A huge thank you to all the people who follow me.  I never dreamed I would have actual, real followers who were interested in my art AND my health.  You are all special people to me.

As to my health, well, it is what it is.  I’m feeling better the last few days than I have all year.  I continue to be returned to a life.  For that I am grateful.

As to the art in this blog, well this is something different for me.

As you may know, I take classes at the Digital Art Academy (DAA).It was founded by Karen Bonaker, a fabulous artist.  Check out her blog here.  We learn art while using the application Painter.

Starting Saturday, I am taking Japanese Inks from Karen at DAA.

This is a type of art I have studiously ignored all my life.  I have had no interest in it at all.

So, why not broaden my horizon is what I figured.  I’m totally intimidated, of course.  Something new. There is a small part of me saying “you’ll never be able to do this.”  But, I’m happy to report there is a larger part saying “yes, I can!”  This is a huge change for me.  Mrs. Negative had her way with me for a long time.  But I have practiced being positive and loving myself and my art.  I put Mrs. Negative Voice on a time out recently.  I refuse to engage with her on any level.

Interestingly, I am finding that she is becoming less and less by my not engaging and fighting with her.  When she pops up, I lovingly as possible put her on a time out.  Of course, she will try to come back.  I just gently remind her of the time out.

Looking Forward

Looking Forward

Looking Forward

Looking Forward is what I like to do.  One can choose to look at the past, whine over previous mistakes, regret what was or look forward and see what can be.  I found that life is way too short for regrets of what was.  I realized that it is human to make mistakes.  It is the human condition.  So, no use fretting over them.

I recently did this painting with a group I belong to on Facebook.

We do intuitive paintings by using prompts that people in the group suggest.  For instance, this painting started out by one woman suggesting that we cover our canvas in a fun color or two and make sweeping marks and stay loose.  Then the next person chimed in to do the same, using contrasting colors.  I suggested we cover the 1/3 of our canvas with geometric shapes.  Then someone suggested adding tissue paper or some other media to give the painting texture.

I am the only digital painter in the group.  I particularly enjoy this group, because it challenges me.  When they suggest something that I can’t necessarily do the same way they are going to do it, I get to use my imagination and do it digitally.  So, I just imported a blue piece of tissue paper into my painting.

For those of you using Painter, you can bring things like this into Painter on a layer of its own by going to File/Place.

However, pieces of tissue paper hanging out on the page did not look cool.

So, having recently taken a dynamite brush class at the DAA (Digital Art Academy), I simply made a brush that would respond to texture.

I have a huge collection of textures to paint on.  One way I can use these textures in Painter is through the paper panel.  Over the years I have collected various paper textures from pond scum (really good one) to asphalt.  I chose a couple of these and with a darker blue, added some texture to the blue/violet areas of the piece.

In the beginning of this piece, I chose to use liquid inks and dribble red, oranges and yellows over the page to give myself something else besides just paint strokes to start with.

I also used pencils to add some interest to the piece.  I am finding that using a very dark or very light-colored pencil in my work will add pop to the piece.

If you’re interested in joining our Paint Prompt Facebook group, please drop me a line and let me know.  We’re always looking for new members.

I’m Calling You

I'm Calling You

I’m Calling You

 

I have been wanting to use more kinds of media in my work to give it more interest and texture.  In this piece, I used liquid inks, pencils and oils.

I have decided to focus on getting better values in my paintings.  Values (or tones) are the darks and lights in a painting.  Not so much the colors, as their values. For instance, a highly saturated yellow can have a dark value in a painting.

I was dismayed when I first learned this about value.  I love to use really bright colors.  But doing that in the painting means that the painting won’t have much depth.  If you don’t have much depth, you usually don’t have much of a painting.

So, what’s a girl like me to do?  I have had to tone down my colors.  I looked to the Impressionists.  They have incredibly bright paintings, or so it would seem.  However, many of them used greys in their paintings to make their other colors look bright.

Right now, in my paintings using grey is just not something I’m up for.  So I started adding highly saturated colors that also contained a lot of white.  That way, I can get better values going in my paintings.

I’ve been working with a new category of brushes in Painter, the app I use.  They are called liquid inks.  Painter has a category for regular inks, but liquid inks are a whole other thing.  

Look In My Eyes

Look In My Eyes

Look In My Eyes

I have taken a brush making class at the Digital Art Academy (DAA). The DAA is an on-line school that teaches art while using Painter, the app I use to make my art.  Jason Maranto taught the class.  It has been fantastic.

First, let me explain about brushes in Painter.  You don’t just grab your mouse and paint.  I use a stylus and tablet that plugs into my computer.

Painter comes with over 700 brushes.  These brushes are in many media, such as oils, acrylics, pastels, charcoal, pens, pencils, watercolors, conte, markers, crayons, inks and others.  The brushes actually mimic real world media.  The brushes work with paper textures.  So one can take charcoal or pastels and draw on a rough surface or smooth surface.  The brushes will show the textures of the rough papers and be smooth in the others.

The brushes in Painter have a number of adjustments.  Painter calls these adjustments the Brush Engine.  It is much like an engine, very complicated.  For each brush, there are setting about how the brush will interact with paper, opacity of the paint, the saturation of the paint, the paper grain, the angle the brush is held, and many more settings for each brush.  Users of Painter can make brushes in addition to making adjustments to the brushes that come with the program.

In my art, I want as much as possible to have every part of it my touches, my strokes, my decisions.  In order to do that with digital art, I needed to understand the brush engine. 

New Paintings

Summer Flowers

Summer Flowers

Wildflowers

Wildflowers

Through the DAA (Digital Art Academy), I belong to Karen Bonaker’s Painter Club.  For $50.00 every six months, she puts together excellent three to four hour video tutorials and provides us with great brushes for Painter that she custom makes.

This month was flowers.  The idea of this tutorial was to do one piece using complementary colors and the next piece to use colors from nature.  Complementary colors are those that are opposite each other on the color wheel.  I chose red and green for my first piece.

I started the piece by laying in some light color with a watercolor brush.  Then I used a new brush Karen had provided to dab in some greens.

In Painter X3, Corel added a new feature for the brushes called Jitter.  This had been available before, but now it is available in the grain, opacity and several other settings.  It is supposed to give the brush a more natural look.  I don’t know if it does or not.

I used Karen’s Poppy Brush, with jitter set to four, to make the impressionist-like flowers. Then I turned the jitter option off and made the sharper flowers.

To give some interest to this piece, I used what are called Overlays to start to do something to the background. The first one was a pink and blue one Karen had made.

In Painter, I placed this overlay into the painting on a layer and changed the layer to multiply.  When I add multiply to the layer it becomes transparent.  The colors show, but do not cover the layers underneath.

Next, I used a pattern overlay.  In Painter, patterns are usually just that, patterns.  They can be added in all kinds of ways into the painting.  In this case, the pattern I used was also made by Karen Bonaker.  It was an overlay.  Have I thoroughly confused everyone?

I took down the opacity in both overlays and let just a bit of each show through.  You can see just shades of the pink and blue overlay.  If you look in the stems closely, you can see the drips from the pattern overlay.

After the overlays, I went back with a new leaf brush Karen had provided in this month’s brushes.  I added in a lot of green to the mid area of the painting.

I finished by adding in some stems with a couple of different brushes.

To finish this piece, I used an effect called Equalize.  This adjusts the white and black values of the painting and gives it pop.

The second piece, I am not all that happy with, but I decided to post it.  It started out as a flower, then turned into a landscape.  I spent way too much time on it.  I am determined to start doing my work without taking so long.  I think things turn out better when they are more spontaneous.

At the moment, I’m very confused whether I want to paint realistically or stick to my abstracts.  I really think I use my imagination more in the abstracts.  But the landscapes and realistic pieces seem to be calling my name.

Stay tuned to see what happens.

 

 

%d bloggers like this: